Cultivating the imaginative ear for jazz improvisation Anthony Maceli

ISBN: 9781109038163

Published:

NOOKstudy eTextbook

403 pages


Description

Cultivating the imaginative ear for jazz improvisation  by  Anthony Maceli

Cultivating the imaginative ear for jazz improvisation by Anthony Maceli
| NOOKstudy eTextbook | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 403 pages | ISBN: 9781109038163 | 9.54 Mb

Over the years, many jazz educators have struggled with the concept of how to effectively teach jazz improvisation. Wittmer and Robbins (1988) surveyed the pedagogical materials for the teaching and learning in jazz and acknowledged the wealth ofMoreOver the years, many jazz educators have struggled with the concept of how to effectively teach jazz improvisation.

Wittmer and Robbins (1988) surveyed the pedagogical materials for the teaching and learning in jazz and acknowledged the wealth of materials published in the thirty years preceding the survey. The Jamey Aebersold Jazz Aids Catalog (2007) provides a current source that garners further support of Wittmer and Robbins observations.

The amount of literature devoted to jazz improvisation speaks not only to the needs of the students, but also to the diversity of pedagogical approaches.-The purpose of this multi-case study was to document how thirteen beginning jazz improvisation students at the college level developed their aural skills in three distinct but unique educational settings over the course of one semester.

These settings, a jazz classroom, a cooperative learning dyad, and a jazz jam session, provided a snapshot of how beginning improvisers hear melodies, rhythms, chord changes, and other musical elements in jazz. More specifically, the two goals of this research paper were (a) to determine how beginning improvisers at the college level developed aural skills in those settings (the jazz classroom, the cooperative learning dyad, and the jazz jam session), and (b) to determine which factors affected the ability to develop aural skills in each setting.

This study occurred throughout one college semester in the Fall of 2006.-The findings of this study showed that students developed their aural skills in these settings based on interaction with a jazz parent. This jazz parent took on a different form in each setting as follows: (a) jazz classroom setting---jazz parent=instructor, (b) jam session---jazz parent=other jam session participants, (c) cooperative learning dyad---jazz parent=dyad partner.

Additionally, this study found that fear and community most affected the ability to develop aural skills in each setting.



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "Cultivating the imaginative ear for jazz improvisation":


thefungiforager.com

©2008-2015 | DMCA | Contact us